Dr Suzie Edge on 21st century nutrition and health

Tag: metabolic syndrome

As (IF) we should be eating breakfast.

As (IF) we should be eating breakfast.

Bottom line: the body could use more time off eating to lower insulin and to use its own stored fats for energy. Remember when we were growing up we might occasionally have had “a snack”? It was a cheeky stop between meals for something yummy […]

Please help me write the book – a new Patreon page.

Please help me write the book – a new Patreon page.

Let’s do this! Please help me write the book. I’ve launched a Patreon page to help enable my research and writing. Against The Grain – a lifestyle manifesto for the future of the NHS. You can follow this link to become a patron here. Thank […]

I don’t have time to wait for your precious trials.

I don’t have time to wait for your precious trials.

We go to conferences for a lot of reasons, education, CPD, a day out of the office, networking. Networking means meeting up with like minded people but it also means stepping out of your bubble and meeting face to face with those who may not share your song-sheet. This latter scenario is more than likely to happen at a conference for medics about nutrition and public health, especially if you have a slightly controversial way of eating.

If I had known, I wouldn’t have chosen to sit next to the excitable judging vegan at dinner but the opportunity to talk did lead to some interesting discussion.

I don’t attack anyone who chooses a lifestyle that is different to mine, there are of course good vegan diets and there are highly processed, sugary breakfast cereal and Dorito diets. In my opinion if any diet requires supplementation then there is something fundamentally wrong with that diet. As I said, I don’t make personal attacks but I do get them, in social media land, for eating meat. That aside, and back to dinner…

As my prawn in garlic butter starter arrived I was informed that I really needed to consider a plant based diet for my health.

My dinner companion was staunchly against a low carbohydrate diet, her main argument being that “there is no existing data about low carb diets that tells us they are safe in the long term”. It is a line that I have heard before, to the letter, so I concluded that this was not her own conclusion. That aside, she went on to acknowledge my recent weight loss, that I no longer need to take a PPI or an inhaler, or regular pain killers, or any antidepressants that I had taken in the past. She acknowledged that it was great I could now ski with my children and that I enjoy martial arts training with them also, but she remained concerned about my future because “there’s no data”.

Well, here’s my data.

Right now I’m sitting on a high speed train heading home. There are no double blind randomised controlled trials by some eminent Harvard epidemiologist to tell me that not sticking my head out of the door is better for my long term health. Without that paper, I just don’t know what decision to make! My point is this. It is not a good enough academic argument to tell me that there are no high-evidence-level papers. If a student said that to me I would say “well done for your literature search, now let me hear what YOU think, what’s your best educated guess? Let’s formulate some ideas and thoughts. What do you think my future might have looked like without a change.”

I will tell you what my future looked like, as I told her. It looked like more and more physical inability, not being able to play with my children, it looked like diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, perhaps chronic kidney disease and hypertension. It looked like more medication, more PPI, more painkillers, diabetes medication, antihypertensives. It looked like more issues with PCOS and more depressive episodes.  It looked like an increased risk of stroke, heart disease, Alzheimer’s and some cancers. With this going on I can tell you that my risk of dying younger is increased. It looked sad. That’s what we can say my future looked like, before I ditched the sugar and the grains, the breakfast cereals and the low fat yoghurts. So you might not have a paper, but I’m not waiting for you to catch up. I’m hedging my bets right now.

The conversation then turned to our views on intermittent fasting or time restricted eating but that’s for the next blog post…

As my main course arrived, a steak with a few more prawns, she looked longingly at my plate. “I love prawns in garlic butter” she muttered.

Yes, so do I.

Suzie

 

…but you “just can’t cut out a whole food group”.

…but you “just can’t cut out a whole food group”.

Every day I hear the scoffing phrase “you just can’t cut out a whole food group” or “you just can’t demonise a food group”. It is an inbuilt, long-ago-learned phrase that you will often hear said against those improving their health by reducing their carbohydrate […]

Is the UK leading the way in a grass roots LCHF public health solution?

Is the UK leading the way in a grass roots LCHF public health solution?

This week has been a very positive one. Could the UK be leading the way in a grass roots low-carb public health solution? Listening to the KetoWoman Podcast at the end of last week was a treat. Daisy and Louise had been at the Public […]

Why you won’t lose weight trying to balance with will power.

Why you won’t lose weight trying to balance with will power.

Go find yourself a beam, a branch or one of those slack-lines and try balancing for a bit. How long can you last? Probably not as long as you’d like because chance are, like me, you are not an Olympic gymnast. Sure, you can engage your core and last a bit longer but you’re going to fall off. Do you think your falling off is due to your lack of will power or could there be other factors at play?

The concept of trying to balance anything will set you up for failure. No more so than the concept of a balanced diet, where you want to lose weight. Take a look at the “eat well” plate. I am reluctantly calling it by it’s name here but I don’t think it represents eating well at all.

If you follow this “eat well” plan, with its huge proportion of carbohydrates, by trying the balance macros, no matter how much you restrict calories, you will struggle to lose weight in the long term. Sure, calorie restriction and moderation of all these foods can lead to short term weight loss and you can quote the names of many CICO friends to me if you like but have we not grown out of the miserable self-loathing calorie restriction by now?

Look at the beige block of carbohydrates on that plate (the breads, cereals, pastas and biscuits). That’s a big chunk of stuff that there is actually no essential requirement for in our bodies. There is no disease of carbohydrate deficiency. The tiny amount of glucose that the body does need (in the blood represented by the blood sugar measurement) is used only by mitochondria-free red blood cells and can be manufactured by the body from other nutrients when it is needed. You don’t need to add extra, you don’t need this stuff, yet you keep coming back for more. Why is that?

Every food item that you choose to eat will set off a hormonal response within your body. So when you start your day with Special K, or dare I say it, “healthy” low-fat yogurt with bananas and raisins you will stimulate a big insulin response. Increases in insulin will, amongst other functions, signal to the fat cells around your body to keep hold of their fat. There’s no need to give up ANY precious fat stores when there’s carbohydrates about and winter is just around the corner when fruit might be scarce! When the job is done and the insulin levels drop and you run out of high levels of glucose (and all those carbs become glucose, even the whole grains) the response from your body is to find yourself some more of that feel-good stuff. Your body will make you need more of the feel-good stuff. If you ignore or fight those signals, you’ll feel hungry and miserable. Does this sound familiar?

What I am trying to say, is that this is not about any lack of will power. It is not a lack of will power that leads to your mid morning cheeky snack, it is your hormonal response to what you ate for breakfast and what you always eat, if you are following the recommended “healthy eat well plate”. That snack, even if it is a bunch of fruit (especially if it is a bunch of fruit) will set off the whole process again.

Finding a balance is hard and miserable and if you want to lose weight, it is nonsensical. Doing so by trying to moderate a carbohydrate-heavy insulin-inducing “eat-well” plate is nuts. You should eat more nuts.

If you are shaking your head and telling me that you couldn’t possibly give up bread or pasta (or those sugar filled bananas and raisins) then maybe you just don’t want to lose weight? Then again, maybe that’s not will power, maybe that’s a reliance on a food stuff that has no essential requirement by our bodies but we really like how it makes us feel. If this conversation was about cocaine, you’d be shocked.

Suzie

Some resources:

Low Carb diets lower insulin from Diet Doctor.com

Jason Fung on physiology, satiety and hormones.

Some more on insulin in this video by Dr Eric Berg:

 

Crap Nutrition School 101

Crap Nutrition School 101

I was just flicking through a book that I used as a junior doctor when I first started working. Oxford Handbooks are the pocket sized bibles for anyone starting in medicine. Page 87 got me thinking – the page of nutritional requirements. At the top […]

Secretary of State for Poor Health

Secretary of State for Poor Health

I’ve been catching up with Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall and his fat fight. He likes a good fight and I’m so glad he has chosen this one. Whilst I’m a little down that the calories-in-calories-out mantra is still prevailing, there was something that was even more […]

Dealing with cramps – Part I

Dealing with cramps – Part I

Leg cramps are a common complaint for those starting out on a low carb or ketogenic diet. I was a bit worried, if I’m honest, because I have a grizzly history with cramps. I was afflicted from an early age (long before keto) and my mother was the same. My pregnancies were just nine long months of painful cramps and endless peeing. They are benign, nocturnal or exercise induced cramps and I also often get some less troublesome post-exercise fasciculations (twitching as opposed to big muscle contractions).

My blood levels of Potassium, Sodium and Magnesium have never been anything other than normal (when being tested of course). I went to my GP once, when I was 19, I was playing rugby, drinking beer, partying a lot and waking at night with vicious cramps. His suggestion – stop eating tomatoes. He meant well and was genuinely looking for up-to-date answers but I was sceptical and never took his advice.

My cramps were noticeable when I started a proper ketogenic diet this time round. I’ve played about with low carb/ketogenic diets previously but don’t remember thinking about cramps in depth.  The cramps occur most often in my calves but also in the front of my legs (so so painful), throughout my feet and also my hands (that’s actually quite funny when it happens, as long as it doesn’t last). I get cramps in my abdominal muscles and in my big back/neck muscles. You name them, lots of my muscles like to cramp. It can from time to time be distressing and can leave me sore for many days. You can see why I went to the GP. My cramps may have increased on the ketogenic diet but at the same time I increased the amount of exercise I was doing. I am rugby training as well as martial arts training, I recently ran a 10km and have been in competition for steps with my fitbit friends. I have also been very self-aware since ditching carbs, clocking every feeling and twitch, so it may not have been an increase, just an increased awareness.

Of course I have seen the advice to drink more water, take more salt, check my potassium and magnesium intake, drink bone broth, drink pickle juice. I take supplements. I haven’t noticed any change. I see a lot of people advising potassium or magnesium supplementation but I never saw any of them quote any evidence.

I wanted some answers and so I started researching. There is some interesting physiology research out there, there are some brain tickling N=1 thoughts and there is lots of very general advice around keto-flu and supplementation of various electrolytes. It will be difficult though to find out what helps for me if I don’t actually quantify the cramps. I already diligently record what I eat, so I have started to record cramps, including the details of muscle groups, extent and timing. Then when I have some idea of the extent of the problem, I can start to look for correlations and can start to change up the diet and supplements to look for any changes. Again, I’m sceptical that I can find an answer after so many years, but I’m looking.

So, watch this space and I will publish some results – one way or another. I have more questions than answers just now. Here are some links…

Central nervous system or peripheral generation? I always assumed that the mechanism was a peripheral one (local to the muscle and local motor neurons/terminal nerve branches) but it looks like there could be a central mechanism that is important. This has interesting bearing on prevention.

Jimmy Moore’s take: http://livinlavidalowcarb.com/blog/got-low-carb-leg-cramps-get-more-potassium/1680

Looks like a nice result for the magnesium crowd, though I haven’t properly read through this so can’t comment yet. Then again, maybe just if you’re pregnant.

Then there’s what Diet Doctor says. They mention Volek and Phinney’s book – I haven’t read that yet (gasp, what an admission!).

I will get back to you.

Suzie

 

Navigating Keto and lchf with sugar-filled kids

Navigating Keto and lchf with sugar-filled kids

Navigating the food pyramid with the next generation is really hard, especially when you are trying to turn it upside down. The next generation, and by that, I mean my kids, are going to need a lot of help. My children are already being taught […]

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