Dr Suzie Edge on 21st century nutrition and health

Tag: Big food

Please help me write the book – a new Patreon page.

Please help me write the book – a new Patreon page.

Let’s do this! Please help me write the book. I’ve launched a Patreon page to help enable my research and writing. Against The Grain – a lifestyle manifesto for the future of the NHS. You can follow this link to become a patron here. Thank […]

Beanz means more than they care to tell you about…

Beanz means more than they care to tell you about…

I adore baked beans, I always have done. Whenever I went home from University my Mum would make a special  effort to stock up on lots of tins just for me. It wasn’t just Heinz that I liked, any variety would do. I love them […]

We treat the NHS the way we treat Type II Diabetes. Really badly.

We treat the NHS the way we treat Type II Diabetes. Really badly.

We treat the NHS the way we treat Type II Diabetes and our priorities are all wrong.

With T2DM, a condition brought on by years of sugar and carbohydrate loading, we continue to shovel in more refined carbohydrates, starches and sugars. We hope it will be OK, we tell people it is a progressive disease and we just cover it with fancy expensive drugs and then insulin once it gets bad enough. Where there are real concerns we just cover them with a band-aid. When it becomes too much for the sticky plasters to handle, we have to cut off the limbs that are beyond saving.

This is a strategy that is not working.

As for the NHS, creaking as it is at the seams, we continue to pour in an increasingly unhealthy population with chronic western lifestyle diseases that are entirely preventable and in some cases reversible. We think that the solution to this problem is treatment with more money. More money for drugs and technology and nurses and doctors and beds. When there’s no longer enough money to cope, we cut off the departments, selling what we can to private companies.

This too, is a strategy that is not working.

The solution to both of  these crises is to stop cramming in the things that caused the problems in the first place and guess what? They are the same things.

T2DM can be prevented or reversed by putting a stop to the onslaught of dietary carbohydrates and the subsequent hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. Many of the western lifestyle associated diseases can be thought of in the same way. Decent, researched lifestyle advice, uninfluenced by the food and drug industry’s lobbying, needs to be put in place to bring a halt to the onslaught of an increasingly sick population’s need for more NHS care.

Prevention of T2DM, obesity, cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, gout, osteoarthritis, some aspects of mental illnesses, maybe even Alzheimer’s and some cancers is all possible with nutrition and lifestyle interventions. That is what will solve so many problems for the NHS, not the fancy new drugs and technologies that cost us millions and make only a handful of people their fortunes.

We need to start prioritising prevention or we will reach a point where there are no longer any limbs left to cut off and the inevitable will happen.

Suzie

Is the UK leading the way in a grass roots LCHF public health solution?

Is the UK leading the way in a grass roots LCHF public health solution?

This week has been a very positive one. Could the UK be leading the way in a grass roots low-carb public health solution? Listening to the KetoWoman Podcast at the end of last week was a treat. Daisy and Louise had been at the Public […]

We need to talk about breakfast.

We need to talk about breakfast.

We need to talk about breakfast. The most common question I am asked when it comes to diet is what to eat for breakfast, especially by those seeking a low-carb option. When you’ve got a whole family to sort out before school and work, breakfast […]

Why you won’t lose weight trying to balance with will power.

Why you won’t lose weight trying to balance with will power.

Go find yourself a beam, a branch or one of those slack-lines and try balancing for a bit. How long can you last? Probably not as long as you’d like because chance are, like me, you are not an Olympic gymnast. Sure, you can engage your core and last a bit longer but you’re going to fall off. Do you think your falling off is due to your lack of will power or could there be other factors at play?

The concept of trying to balance anything will set you up for failure. No more so than the concept of a balanced diet, where you want to lose weight. Take a look at the “eat well” plate. I am reluctantly calling it by it’s name here but I don’t think it represents eating well at all.

If you follow this “eat well” plan, with its huge proportion of carbohydrates, by trying the balance macros, no matter how much you restrict calories, you will struggle to lose weight in the long term. Sure, calorie restriction and moderation of all these foods can lead to short term weight loss and you can quote the names of many CICO friends to me if you like but have we not grown out of the miserable self-loathing calorie restriction by now?

Look at the beige block of carbohydrates on that plate (the breads, cereals, pastas and biscuits). That’s a big chunk of stuff that there is actually no essential requirement for in our bodies. There is no disease of carbohydrate deficiency. The tiny amount of glucose that the body does need (in the blood represented by the blood sugar measurement) is used only by mitochondria-free red blood cells and can be manufactured by the body from other nutrients when it is needed. You don’t need to add extra, you don’t need this stuff, yet you keep coming back for more. Why is that?

Every food item that you choose to eat will set off a hormonal response within your body. So when you start your day with Special K, or dare I say it, “healthy” low-fat yogurt with bananas and raisins you will stimulate a big insulin response. Increases in insulin will, amongst other functions, signal to the fat cells around your body to keep hold of their fat. There’s no need to give up ANY precious fat stores when there’s carbohydrates about and winter is just around the corner when fruit might be scarce! When the job is done and the insulin levels drop and you run out of high levels of glucose (and all those carbs become glucose, even the whole grains) the response from your body is to find yourself some more of that feel-good stuff. Your body will make you need more of the feel-good stuff. If you ignore or fight those signals, you’ll feel hungry and miserable. Does this sound familiar?

What I am trying to say, is that this is not about any lack of will power. It is not a lack of will power that leads to your mid morning cheeky snack, it is your hormonal response to what you ate for breakfast and what you always eat, if you are following the recommended “healthy eat well plate”. That snack, even if it is a bunch of fruit (especially if it is a bunch of fruit) will set off the whole process again.

Finding a balance is hard and miserable and if you want to lose weight, it is nonsensical. Doing so by trying to moderate a carbohydrate-heavy insulin-inducing “eat-well” plate is nuts. You should eat more nuts.

If you are shaking your head and telling me that you couldn’t possibly give up bread or pasta (or those sugar filled bananas and raisins) then maybe you just don’t want to lose weight? Then again, maybe that’s not will power, maybe that’s a reliance on a food stuff that has no essential requirement by our bodies but we really like how it makes us feel. If this conversation was about cocaine, you’d be shocked.

Suzie

Some resources:

Low Carb diets lower insulin from Diet Doctor.com

Jason Fung on physiology, satiety and hormones.

Some more on insulin in this video by Dr Eric Berg:

 

Crap Nutrition School 101

Crap Nutrition School 101

I was just flicking through a book that I used as a junior doctor when I first started working. Oxford Handbooks are the pocket sized bibles for anyone starting in medicine. Page 87 got me thinking – the page of nutritional requirements. At the top […]

Secretary of State for Poor Health

Secretary of State for Poor Health

I’ve been catching up with Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall and his fat fight. He likes a good fight and I’m so glad he has chosen this one. Whilst I’m a little down that the calories-in-calories-out mantra is still prevailing, there was something that was even more […]

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...